The kung fu diva Kara Hui known by Shaw Brothers movies is back in Ho Yuhang’s martial arts film Mrs K.

Mrs K is a story of a woman who gives everything that she has to protect her husband and daughter when enemies from her past come hunting her.

The film is the Malaysia-Hong Kong co-production and also stars Simon Yam, Wu Bai, Siow Li Xuan, Fruit Chan, Kirk Wong. Movie has already been shown at SIFF.

Synopsis: All seems well on the domestic front for Mrs K (iconic Hong Kong actress Kara Wai of Shaw Brothers Studio fame), an upper middle class housewife living in a gated property in Malaysia with her husband (legendary Taiwanese rocker Wu Bai) and their daughter (newcomer Li Xuan Siow).

Check out the trailer below.

Mrs K

During a gathering of family and friends, an unwanted guest from her past appears demanding a ransom. In the meantime, Mrs K’s motley crew of old acquaintances (starring directors Fruit Chan, Dian Iskander Said, Kirk Wong Chi Keung and martial arts legend Lau Wing) are being hunted down by a mysteriousman (Simon Yam) and his sidekick (Malaysian actor Faizal Hussein) who creep their way towards a confrontation with Mrs K. As old rivals turn up in the city, Mrs K has to react, through sheer will and instinct, to protect her family who has become collateral for her past deeds. These events escalate like wild fire, dragging back Mrs K’s veiled past and her sharply tuned survivalist skills into action. Surprisingly, her endearing family turns out to be a force to be reckoned with.

Mrs K sees the Malaysian New Wave director Ho Yuhang reuniting with Kara Wai after their past collaboration in At the End the Daybreak (2009), a film which led to a revival of Wai’s career as an action actress. This time round, Ho crafts a narrative that is revealing of the cultural diversity and connectivity of Asia and the Southeast Asian archipelago. He gathers an ensemble of iconic actors from the region together for what has to be one of the most unique genre films to have emerged from Asia, informed by Ho’s trajectory as a cineaste and his love for cinema.

With a deep appreciation and sensibility for the canon of Hollywood and Italian Westerns, Ho fuses its most universal and endearing motifs and combines them with the attractions of a Wu Xia (martial arts) epic, transposing a pugilistic universe within the noir-ish cityscape of Malaysia. Skillfully crafted with literary dexterity, Mrs K unfolds through guns, fists and words of profound mythical gravitas. Ho generously lends a composed empathy for all its characters, imbuing them with charisma and psychological depth that cuts through the veneer of good and evil, and of heroes and villains, in this timeless tale of vengeance and redemption.